Birding

Bean goose and winter deer

On Saturday I drove down to Lincoln City to see my mom.

We met up at Nestucca Wildlife Refuge to join the Audubon Society of Lincoln City in their monthly (free) bird walk. The main excitement of this trek was the opportunity to see the (probably) most rare bird in North America: The Tundra Bean Goose current hanging out with the resident Cackling Geese at the refuge. As this bird typically resides in Asia, birders from all over have come to gawk at this unusual resident.

The ASLC gives GREAT bird walks; the leaders are so knowledgeable that I learn things every time I go out with them. The birds weren’t terrible cooperative this trip; I know our leader, Jack, was hoping to see a Northern Pygmy Owl sighted regularly in the area, but we didn’t have any luck with that. All of us spotted a ruby-crowned kinglet, an American kestrel, and an assortment of other birds, but most were at a distance and my photos were not great. One exciting spot was a Cassin’s vireo; a couple members got good pictures, but I only heard it.

When i was walking down to see the Tundra, however, I did spot a nice little doe and (probably) her last spring fawns enjoying a late morning snack before bedding down for the day.

After the formal walk, the group did a quick road tour of a nearby pond. Again, I only spotted a few birds, but one young red tail posed for an extended period on a wire just at road height for some great photos.

Mom and I decided to get lunch in Seaside, and from there we when to Whalen Island. It was the first time I’d been there and I was very impressed. I saw a golden-crowned kinglet, a bald eagle, and several egrets. Mom and I were amused by two or three Anna’s hummingbirds enjoying a quince thicket.

It was a good day. I wish Dad could have been there.